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vacation

Are you ready to get away from the cold and the snow and escape to a beautiful, warm beach somewhere? Or maybe the snow doesn’t sound so bad and you’re dreaming about hitting the slopes at a ski resort?

If you’re self-employed or a small business owner, you know that it’s not always easy to get away. Unlike your friends with office jobs, you don’t have paid vacation days and there’s not always someone to take care of your clients while you’re gone.

However, small business owners have a unique advantage — and that’s the ability to mix business and pleasure when it comes to travel. Done right, it is possible to enjoy a few days of much-needed R&R while also lowering your tax bill.

Here’s a break down of what you need to know in order to legally expense parts of your vacation travel.

The Primary Purpose of the Trip Needs to Be Business

The first thing to know is that you can deduct transportation expenses if the primary purpose of your trip is for business. It will be hard to justify expensing your airfare for a 7-day trip to the Florida Keys when you only have one day of meetings.

As a general rule of thumb, you should count up the number of business and personal days in your planned trip; the majority of days must be for business activities. Keep in mind that your travel days can count as business activities, and so does a weekend that’s sandwiched in between workdays on Friday and Monday.

So if you fly to Florida on a Thursday, have a meeting on Friday, stay the weekend, meet with clients on Monday and Tuesday, and fly home Wednesday, you’ve actually accrued seven business days. This means you could spend another six days in Florida as pure vacation and still expense your transportation expenses.

You Need to Set Up Your Business Appointments Before You Leave

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About Nellie Akalp

Nellie Akalp is a passionate entrepreneur, small business advocate and mother of four. As CEO of CorpNet, a legal document filing service, Nellie helps entrepreneurs start a business, incorporate, form an LLC or set up Sole Proprietorships (DBAs) for a new or existing business.

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  • Roger Duyong

    As always, I enjoy reading your fresh ideas which can be applied in places like mine. Times have changed and for those knowing what to do with the advent of technologies and internet, the sky’s the limit.